Hack MySQL

Hiring: Perl programmer, PHP programmer, UI/UX consultant

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I don’t get to say this often, but “I’m hiring” (at Percona):

I’ve been with Percona for about 5 years, so I can tell you: it’s probably the best company to work at: great pay, great benefits, great people, and truly driven by a desire to do right by customers and do good work.  What more can you ask for?  Of course, all these jobs are MySQL-related: Perl + MySQL, PHP + MySQL–maybe the UI/UX job less so, but still close enough.

Written by Daniel Nichter

April 19th, 2013 at 11:02 am

Posted in MySQL

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Speaking at PLMCE 2013

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Yes it’s still 4 months away, but some pre-selected sessions for Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2013 have been released, and one is mine: Survey of Percona Toolkit: Command-line Tools for MySQL.  If you’ve not heard of Percona Toolkit, or have but have been putting off getting acquainted with it, attend my talk and I’ll get you off to a good start.  And if you didn’t know: I’m the lead PT developer, so I know the tools pretty well.

Written by Daniel Nichter

December 11th, 2012 at 6:39 pm

Posted in MySQL

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Taxonomy of database tools

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Taxonomy of Database Tools

In the MySQL ecosphere there is an ecosystem of tools.  Like real-world ecosystems, the “creatures” in the MySQL tools ecosystem can be classified and organized by a taxonomy.  There are already multiple taxonomies of software bugs (e.g. A Taxonomy of Bugs), but as far as I know this is the first Taxonomy of Database Tools.  A taxonomy of database tools serves useful purposes, as discussed in the previously linked page.  For me, the most useful purpose is the high-level ecosystem view which I use to compare MySQL tools to Drizzle tools.  In so doing, one sees clearly how the MySQL tools ecosystem is thriving whereas the Drizzle tools ecosystem is just budding, so to speak.  For other people, I imagine two overarching interests in a taxonomy of database tools.

First, by laying out the ecosphere in a simple, organized, and comprehensible fashion, a taxonomy of database tools can permit a user (DBA, sysadmin, etc.) to see how well they are “tooled”.  For example, when I gave a presentation on pt-table-checksum at PLMCE 2012, I was surprised to learn how many people never used a tool to verify replication data integrity.  I did not bother to ask why, but I suspect it is because they were not aware that such tools existed.  By looking at this taxonomy of database tools, some users might discover a new type of tool of which there are already many examples.

Second, a taxonomy of database tools is interesting for developers because it reveals where a database server has missing capabilities that users compensate for with tools.  Point in case: pt-table-checksum is used to verifying replication data integrity because until MySQL 5.6 this capability did not exist in the database server.  It is debatable whether all types of tools could be implemented natively in a database server; in theory, they probably could.  This debate becomes a practical concern for modularly-designed database servers like Drizzle because in my humble opinion it is far easier to write plugins and thus tools-as-plugins for Drizzle than for MySQL.

This Taxonomy of Database Tools is still a work in progress.  A lot of the descriptions need to be expanded, traits refined, and more examples added.  If you do not agree with its organization, you can suggest a change, or develop your own taxonomy.  In any case, I will continue to refine this Taxonomy of Database Tools to see where it leads and what it reveals.

Written by Daniel Nichter

May 11th, 2012 at 4:30 pm

PT BOF at PLMCE 2012

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PT BOF at PLMCE 2012, or: I submitted a session for Percona Toolkit Birds of a Feather at Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2012. You should BoF too; hard deadline is Monday, March 12th: submit a BoF session, or submit a Lightning Talk.

Written by Daniel Nichter

March 10th, 2012 at 12:27 pm

Posted in MySQL,Random

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Speaking at Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2012

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I’m speaking at Percona Live MySQL Conference & Expo 2012. My two talk are: Getting Started with Drizzle 7.1 and Verifying MySQL Replication Safely With pt-table-checksum 2.0. No, there’s no relationship between those topics; they’re just things I know well.

I’ve been stalking Drizzle for many years. When it went GA last year, I began hacking Drizzle, focusing on plugins which give it nearly all its functionality. Recently, I helped overhaul the configuration, administration, and plugin sections of the Drizzle docs. I’m also frequently poking around the plugins’ source code. Consequently, I know a lot about making Drizzle work. My talk with transfer the bulk of the best of that knowledge to you so that you can return to your place of work/hobby/world domination and start using Drizzle 7.1 yourself without having to resolve some of the mysteries I had to resolve by reading the source code.

As for pt-table-checksum 2.0, part of Percona Toolkit, it’s a complete re-write of the venerable pt-table-checksum 1.0 which worked very well for years but required some fine-tuning. Well, in certain cases it didn’t work as well, which required more fine-tuning. So Baron redesigned the entire tool (with help and feedback from a lot of people at Percona), and I programmed it. It works wonderfully, and most of the time you can “just run it” and it will Just Do The Right Thing, but you will nonetheless benefit if you come to this talk and poke and prod its internal with me.

If you’ve never been to this conference before (formerly it was just the “MySQL Conference & Expo”, but it’s always been, afaik, at this time and place), you should really come because it’s very enlightening. It’s the Super Bowl/World Cup/Wimbledon/etc. of MySQL conferences in my humble opinion.

Written by Daniel Nichter

January 26th, 2012 at 6:00 pm

Posted in Drizzle,MySQL

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